Medicaid and Asset Protection

The New York Medicaid Estate Recovery Program may place a lien on property owned by benefit  recipients at the time of their death when it is part of an estate being administered in the Surrogate’s Court. That means that any property that is transferred either through a last will and testament (Will), or through the law of intestacy (if the deceased Medicaid recipient made no Will), is subject to being attached....

By invoking spousal refusal, only the income and assets of the spouse who needs care is considered in the Medicaid eligibility examination. The refusing spouse can keep or distribute assets to family members, or otherwise dispose of the financial assets as they please....

The New York Medicaid Consumer Directed Personal Assistance Program (CDPAP) is an innovative program that enables disabled and elders who live in the Community but who need in-home healthcare or personal assistance to recruit family member or friends to provide their care as they direct. The work they perform will be paid for by the state Medicaid program....

Legal actions against community spouses seeking reimbursement for the care of the other spouse were infrequent years ago. Now, state budget pressures have substantially increased the likelihood that  community spouses will face Medicaid recovery claims. Ely J. Rosenzveig & Associates has an impressive track record of defeating or minimizing these claims....

Everyone receiving Medicaid benefits in New York should keep fully informed and up to date on all the changes that became effective on January 1, 2022. The New York Office of Health Insurance Programs (NYOHIP) recently released their “2022 Medicaid Levels and Other Updates,” announcing the new income and resource limits for NY Medicaid eligibility....

The law firm of Ely J. Rosenzveig and Associates has extensive experience creating estate plans that preserve the wealth that you accumulated through decades of effort for those whom you choose to benefit. Through the creation of appropriate legal instruments, the tax burden borne by your estate can be minimized instead of suffering from New York’s Estate Tax “Cliff.”...

When people think of an estate plan, many first think of a Last Will and Testament, or Will. The Will is truly the hallmark document of any estate plan. This is a document that allows a testator (or, a person who has created a Will), to designate beneficiaries who will inherit property such as cash, real estate, personal property, and other assets such as bank and brokerage accounts, from their estate. ...

The key to understanding New York’s Medicaid program coverages and services is to remember that there are two levels of Medicaid: Institutional (Chronic) Medicaid, or nursing home care, and Community Medicaid or home care. The income limits and resource caps for eligibility are a bit different for each plan....

When a person applies for Medicaid, the New Jersey Family Care Eligibility Determining Agency (EDA) verifies the information. The EDA examines each transfer made by a Medicaid applicant within a five-year “look-back period.” If an applicant violates this rule and is found to have gifted or sold an asset for less than fair market value, the agency will impose a penalty period (“a period of Medicaid ineligibility”)....

Spousal refusal is a legal Medicaid planning strategy in New York. Spousal refusal, also known as “just say no,” is when a non-applicant, or “community” spouse of a long-term care Medicaid applicant refuses to assist with the cost of long-term care for their spouse....

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