Estate Planning

If you are named as the executor of a person’s will, or you plan to administer the estate of someone who died without a will, you will be assuming a role of great responsibility as an estate fiduciary. How you perform your new duties will be subject to the oversight of the New York Surrogate’s Court, and the scrutiny of all those who stand to benefit from the decedent’s estate....

An ABLE Account is a special bank account that enables certain people with disabilities to save more money than they would otherwise be able to, in tax advantaged savings accounts -- while continuing to receive benefits from Medicaid, the Supplemental Security Income (SSI) program, Social Security Disability Insurance (SSD or SSDI), or housing assistance....

An administration C.T.A. is a process ordered by the court when the person named as executor in a Will is unable or unwilling to fulfill his/her fiduciary responsibilities. An important part of writing a Will in New York is the designation of someone to act as the executor of the Will when the time comes to submit the Will to the Surrogate’s Court for probate....

When a young couple is starting a new life together, estate planning is probably the last topic on their minds. But, the birth of a child should change that. Suddenly, new parents become responsible for the life of another person, one who will depend on their good judgment and planning. There are immediate estate planning steps new parents should make upon the birth of their first baby....

A Grantor Retained Annuity Trust (GRAT) is an effective tool estate planning and elder law attorneys use to prevent estate and gift taxes from consuming the assets their clients intended for their families and other beneficiaries to receive. Essentially, it is a mechanism to minimize the tax burden on large financial gifts that exceed the annual gift tax exclusion limit....

The New York Medicaid Estate Recovery Program may place a lien on property owned by benefit  recipients at the time of their death when it is part of an estate being administered in the Surrogate’s Court. That means that any property that is transferred either through a last will and testament (Will), or through the law of intestacy (if the deceased Medicaid recipient made no Will), is subject to being attached....

In New York, removing an executor requires substantial evidence of specific grounds set out in the statute that governs their disqualification. Our state’s courts treat the removal of an executor as a very serious step to be taken only in rare circumstances. The courts have ruled that removing an executor annuls the testator’s choice, and should be granted only when the grounds are clearly established or on a clear showing of serious misconduct that endangers the safety of the estate....

A tax transfer certificate is a document issued by the U.S. Internal Revenue Service certifying that a United States citizen who died while living abroad does not owe the federal government any estate taxes. Banks and financial services companies require an IRS tax transfer certificate before they release any of the assets held with the decedent named as an account owner....

The law firm of Ely J. Rosenzveig and Associates has extensive experience creating estate plans that preserve the wealth that you accumulated through decades of effort for those whom you choose to benefit. Through the creation of appropriate legal instruments, the tax burden borne by your estate can be minimized instead of suffering from New York’s Estate Tax “Cliff.”...

When people think of an estate plan, many first think of a Last Will and Testament, or Will. The Will is truly the hallmark document of any estate plan. This is a document that allows a testator (or, a person who has created a Will), to designate beneficiaries who will inherit property such as cash, real estate, personal property, and other assets such as bank and brokerage accounts, from their estate. ...

A special needs or supplemental needs trust (SNT) receives and holds assets for the exclusive benefit of a person who is disabled. The key feature of the SNT is that it is not considered a reachable or countable asset of the disabled beneficiary for the purposes of qualifying for means-tested government programs. Specifically, a SNT does not jeopardize its beneficiary’s  eligibility to receive public benefits like Supplemental Security Income (SSI), or Medicaid....